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Full text of "Circle (Abbot Academy yearbook)"

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Tlie Circle 



1970 



Editor 

Jane Jouett 

Layout 

Susan Johnston 

Photography 
Francine Amore 

Literary 
Tamara Elliott 

Art 
Maura Markley 

Business 

Virginia Knapp 

Faculty Advisor 

Mrs. Stephen Perrin 




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It was the best of times, it was the 
worst of times, it was the age of wis- 
dom, it was the age of foolishness, it 
was the epoch of belief, it was the 
epoch of incredulity, it was the season 
of light, it was the season of darkness, 
it was the spring of hope, it was the 
winter of despair. 

Charles Dickens 




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I^etcvilty 



"a teacher affects eternity; he 
can never tell where his in- 
fluence stops" 

Henry Brooks Adams 




Principal 
Mr. Donald A. Gordon 



I hope I shall always possess 
firmness and virtue enough to 
maintain what I consider the most 
enviable of all titles, the character 
of an "Honest Man". 

George Washington 



Director of Studies 
Mr. John M. Buckey 





Dean of Students & Permissions Director 
Mrs. Florence Griffith 




College Counselor 
Mrs. Herbert Finbury 



Admissions 

Mrs. Jon Kaiser 

Miss Priscilla Peterson 






-A.dixiinistra,tion 



Business Administrators 

David I. Mead, Richard Sheahan 

Richard C. Griggs 





Dietician 
Miss Sarah Proctor 



Business Manager 
Mr. Gardener Sutton 



Alumnae Office 

Miss Jane Sullivan 

Mrs. Frank Diclemente 





Elnglisla. 



Chairman 
Mrs. John Sisson 



Miss Jean St. Pierre 




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I J'- ,< ». * •. ' >''*-, 1 







Mrs. Malcolm Johnston 



Mrs. Timothy Home 




Mrs. Bruce Bugbee 





Mr. Paul Dyer 



Mr. Peter Stapleton 







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M. Ronald Giguere 



Mrs. Christopher Kirkland 



French 







Mile. Marie Baratte 




Chairman of Modern Languages 
Mr. George Krivobok 




Mrs. Wayne Frederick 



JSiDStnisli 



Mrs. Donald Burgy 




Mrs. Susan B. Clark 




Let-tin 




Missing: Mrs. Jon Kaiser 



Chairman 
Miss Dorothy Judd 

Chairman 
Mrs. Paul DeGavre 




^^^^^^-^M 




HiStOry- 




Chairman 
Miss Mary Minard 



Mrs. Robert Lloyd 









Mrs. Oscar Witten 




History 
Mr. Stephen Graham 



Fliil os oid lei y 




Philosophy 
Mrs. Edward Hosmer 




Humanities 
Mr. Stephen Perrin 











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Chairman 
Miss Carolyn Goodwin 





Mrs. Peter Hayne 



IMISLtll. 




Mr. James Lynch 



Mrs. John Bennett 




Science 



Mrs. Robert Hoyt 





Chairman 
Mrs. Joel Salon 



Mrs. James Whyte 




Fine -A-i*ts 



Art 
Mrs. Hartford Powel 





Photography 
Miss Wendy Snyder 



Ceramics 

Mrs. Gordon Bensley 



18 





Art History 
Mrs. Stephen Perrin 



Drama 

Mr. Brian Davidson 



Music 
Mr. Rowland Sturges 

Missing: Mrs. Elizabeth Roberts 
Miss Priscilla Peterson 




Nurses 

Miss Kathleen Ayre & Miss Marion Perkins 




Physical Education 
Miss Shirley Ritchie 




Physical Education 
Mrs. J. Kenrick Butler 




4 



Physical Education 
Mrs. Fred Harrison 




Dance 
Mrs. Angel Rubio 



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20 









Bookstore Manager 
Mrs. Dorothy Quintal 




Librarians 

Mrs. James Couch & Mrs. 



Ronald Valentine 




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Assistant Bookstore Manager 
Mrs. Edith Johanson 



21 



t^^^^^^^^m^^ 




Draper Housemothers 

Standing: Mrs. Kathleen Ross-Dilley, Mrs. Stanley 

Mumma Seated: Mrs. Gerald Trenbath, Mrs. Glenora 

Chittick 



mmmmmmmm 



Hall House family 
Mr. & Mrs. David Maynard 





Outside Housemothers 
Mrs. Capen Abbot, Mrs. Olga Tompkins, Mrs. 
Lynwood Howard. Missing: Mrs. John S. Curry, 
Mrs. Estelle Goggin 



In just- 
spring when the world is mud- 
luscious the little 
lame balloonman 



whistles far and wee 

and eddie and bill come 
running from marbles and 
piracies and it's 
spring 

when the world is puddle-wonderful 

the queer 

old balloonman whistles 

far and wee 

and betty and isabel come dancing 




from hop-scotch and jump-rope and 
it's 

spring 
and 
the 

goat-footed 
balloonman whistles 
far 
and 
wee 





23 













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24 



Hey look us over, lend us an ear 

It's Abbot Bazaar time come again this year. 

We've all been working 

Planning away 

It's gonna be great 

So mark this date 

It's on the tenth of May. 

Look out here come the Gay Nineties 

Rootbeer and all 

We're getting ready 

Let's get on the ball. 

We're depending on you 

To pull us through 

So give us all you've got 

Good things are busting out all over! 

25 





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Sun warm on my back 

My heart light as I walk away. 

Return is no necessity 

Destination no crutch. 
Put your life 
In the journey. 



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Seniors 




Francine Michelle Amore 
89 Burnham Road 
Andover, Massachusetts 

So glad to extend handfuls of 
dawn. 

—Tim Buckley 



Abdy Anderson 

The Warren Belstone 

Okehampton 

Devon, England 

Anderson's at it again! 

—Anderson 




32 



Elisabeth Lawson Andrews 
46 Lone Tree Farm Road 
New Canaan, Connecticut 



"I feel there is an angel in me," she'd 
say, "whom I am constantly shocking." 



■Ferlinghetti 





Diane Lee Anton 
3 Hemlock Drive 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts 



One sweet dream, pack up the bags, 

Get in the limousine. 

Soon we'll be away from here. 

Step on the gas and wipe that tear away. 

—The Beatles 



Gay Gilbert Armsden 

Pepperrell Road 

Kittery Point, Maine 



It knew now where it was going, and it said 
to itself, "There is no hurry, we shall get 
there someday." 

-A. A. Milne 





Amy Carlton Baldwin 
807 San Luis Road 
Berkeley, California 



Sun-treader, 

life and light be thine forever. 



— Robert Browning 



Anjelica Behrends 

c/o Creole Petroleum Corp. 

Apdo. 889, Caracas D.F. 

Venezuela 



In the midst of winter, 

I finally learned that there was 

in an invincible summer. 

—Camus 





H ol lis Elizabeth Bennet 

1 7 Linden Lane 

Duxbury, Massachusetts 



The smile that you send out returns to you. 

— Indian wisdom 




Sarah Burns Bowen 

230 Johnson Street 

North Andover, Massachusetts 



A little sun-burnt from the glare of life. 



Deborah Ellen Bernton 
4 Oxford Street 
Chevy Chase, Maryland 



You give but little when you give of your 
possessions. It is when you give of yourself 
that you truly give. 

— Khalil Gibran 













Marion Sanford Boynton 
32 Long Point Avenue 
Duxbury, Massachusetts 



No one can tell me 
Nobody knows 
Where the wind comes from 
Where the wind goes. 

-A. A. Milne 



Leslie Taft Breed 
159 Phillips Avenue 
Swampscott, Massachusetts 



Is it so small a thing to have enjoyed the 
sun, to have lived in spring, to have loved, 
to have thought, to have done? 

-Matthew Arnold 





Pauline Cerf 

1000 Sunset Drive 

Lawrence, Kansas 



If for just one moment 

You could step outside your mind 

And float across the ceiling, 

don't think the folks would mind. 

—Traffic 



Megan Brook 

Box 124 

Cape Porpoise, Maine 



What is the night; 

Almost at odds with morning, which is 

which. 



-William Shakespeare 





Dorcas Chisholm 
East Hebron 
New Hampshire 

If I can stop one heart from 
breaking, I shall not live in 
vain. 

—Emily Dickenson 



Margaret Rice Cheney 

American Consulate General 

Bombay 26, India 

A Chinese philosopher dreamed he was 
a butterfly, and from that moment he was 
never quite sure that he was not a butter- 
fly dreaming it was a Chinese philosopher. 

—Tom Stoppard 





Susan Kay Cleveland 
190 East 72nd Street 
New York, New York 



The positive always defeats the negative, 
Courage overcomes fear, 
Patience overcomes anger and irritability, 
Love overcomes hatred. 

— Swami Sarasvati 



Janet Ellen Cohen 

14 Thresher Road 

Andover, Massachusetts 



Tell me a lie and I'll cry for you. Tell me of 
sin and I'll laugh. 



—Tim Buckley 





Deborah Louise Collins 
6 Tamys Lane 
Andover, Massachusetts 



I wandered lonely as a cloud . . . 
When all at once I saw a crowd, 
A host of golden daffodils, 
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. 

—Wordsworth 



Lisa Elena Contarino 

76 Hillside Road 

North Andover 

Massachusetts 



Mortals are equal; 
their masks differ. 



—Voltaire 




41 




Anne Townsend Crowley 
77 Henlopen Avenue 
Rehoboth Beach, Delaware 



I do not hunger for a well-stored mind, 

I only wish to live my life, 

And find my heart in unison with all 

mankind. 



Stephanie Helene Dantos 

Maple Lane 

Conway, New Hampshire 



One is amazed 

By a water-lily bud 

Unfolding 

With each passing day, 

Taking on a richer color 

And new dimensions. 

— Naoshi Koriyarla 








Lynne D'arcy 

63 Hawks Hill Road 

New Canaan, Connecticut 



Rest your head inside awhile 
envelop peace . . . reflecting forests 
of warmth - fields of smiles. 



-Chip 



Debra Ann Davison 
205McKinly 
Thomasville, Georgia 



You are not only good your- 
self, but the cause of good in 
others. 



-Socrates 




5? 



43 




Lisa Marie Doyle 

930 Central Road 

Rye Beach, New Hampshire 



I'm taking the time for a number of 
things that weren't important yesterday. 

—The Beatles 



Katherine Durham 
8 Stonehedge Road 
Andover, Massachusetts 



For her own breakfast 

She'll protect a scheme, 

Nor take her tea without a stratagem. 



— Edward Young 





Tamara Lynne Elliott 
5 Midland Circle 
Andover, Massachusetts 



Tomorrow we will run faster, 
stretch out our arms farther . . 
And one fine morning— 



— F. Scott Fitzgerald 



Alexa Perry Freeman 
1286 Willow Lane 
Birmingham, Michigan 



I am of the universe 
And you know 
What it's worth. 

—John Lennon 








Elizabeth Gaines 

51 Buttonwood Lane 

Darien, Connecticut 



You can say I want to be free. 
I can say someday I will be. 



James Taylor 



Anne Marguerite Gares 

35 Rutland Court 

Rutland Gardens 

London S.W., England 



En somme, ce qui m'interesse, c'est de 
savoir comment on devient un saint. 

Camus 










Karen Maria Giesemann 
3ACalle"A" 6-50 Zone 10 
Guatemala City, Guatemala, C.A. 



I believe for every drop 
of rain that falls 
a flower grows. 



-Orpheus 



Nancy Tilton Grassi 
12 Laurelwood Drive 
Shelton, Connecticut 



All the knowledge I possess 
everyone else can acquire, but my 
heart is all my own. 

—Goethe 




Abigail Grout Hale 

918 Timber Branch Parkway 

Alexandria, Virginia 



To stand for the constant presense of process 

And always seem the same; 

To be steady as a rock 

And always trembling. 



— Howard Nemerov 





Susana Gunn 
P.O. Box 945 
San Salvador, El Salvador 



Her ways are the ways of pleasantness, and 
all her paths are peace. 

Proverbs III. 17 




■255*- 



Theresa Onnie Hinkle 
1267 East 16th Avenue 
Columbus, Ohio 




I can be right, 

And I can be wrong. 

My whole life is in my song. 

I am everyday people. 

Sly and The Family Stone 



Julia Elizabeth Hogan 
5 Porter Road 
Andover, Mass. 



The larger the island of knowledge, the 
longer the shoreline of wonder. 



Ralph Sockman 




Susan Hoy 

800 Berkeley Road 

Wilmington, Delaware 



Come run, jump, skip-along Sam 
A very happy man I am. 

Donovan 



Elisabeth Marie Huhn 

R.D. 1 

Ashville, New York 



I praise loudly, I blame softly. 



-Catherine II of Russia 




50 




Pamela Verne Huttenberg 
Harbour House Towers 
Box 306, Apt. 805 
Freeport, Grand Bahama 



To see what everybody else has seen, and 
think what nobody else has thought. 

—Dr. Albert Szent-Gyorgy 



Ronnie Ingraham 

Winemark Avenue 

Oak Bluffs, Massachusetts 



Oh wondrous light 

Light, light, lighter 

You give all your brightness away 

And it only makes you brighter. 

Incredible String Band 




51 





Carla Anne Johnson 
48 School Street 
Andover, Massachusetts 



The reason why birds can fly and 
we can't is simply that they have per- 
fect faith, for to have faith is to have 
wings. 

J.M. Barrie 



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Sondra Elaine Johnson 

P.O. Box 112 

Wise, North Carolina 



A bird does not sing because 
he has an answer, he sings because 

he has a song. 



—Joan Anglund 





Susan Parsons Johnston 
174 Turtle Back Road 
New Canaan, Connecticut 



The door to happiness opens 
outward. 



Kierkegaard 



Sylvia Nelly Joseph 

Apartado 63 

San Salvador, El Salvador 



This is a wonderful world and 
you can't even waste one day, so 
smile, sing and be happy. 

—Jim McGinnis 




53 




Jane Fredrika Jouett 

Estate Elizabeth 

P.O. Box 270 

St. Thomas, Virgin Islands 



Wish I was an English muffin 

'Bout to make the most out of the toaster. 



I V 



-Simon and Garfunkel 



NERVATIONS 



Catherine Virginia Knapp 

438 Jerusalem Road 

Cohasset, Massachusetts 



Strong and content, 
I travel the open road. 

—Whitman 





Amadea Elizabeth Kramer 
Headlong Hall Farm 
Centreville, Maryland 



I cannot help but sense 
the beauty 
over all 
and feeling thus 
be joyful. 

—Eric Gulliksen 



Marsha Leverett Lawton 

North Street 

Litchfield, Connecticut 



You must enter into 

The small silences between 

The leaves, 

You must take your time 

And touch the very peace 

They issue from. 

-John Moffitt 




55 




Sandra Westover Lindgrove 
21630 Knudsen Drive 
Grosse He, Michigan 



As she f l?d through sun and shade 
The happy winds upon her played. 



—Tennyson 



Gay Luster 

12 Norholt Drive 

New Canaan, Connecticut 



If growing up means it would be 

Beneath my dignity to climb a tree 

I'll never grow up! 

—Peter Pan 




56 




Pamela Marie Mallen 
6 Buttenwood Drive 
Methuen, Massachusetts 



Silences make the real conversation be- 
tween frields. Not the saying, but the never 
needing to say is what counts. 



—Margaret Lee Runbeck 



Denise Maloney 

8 Stirling Street 

Andover, Massachusetts 



I'll let you be in my dream 
if you'll let me be in yours. 



•Bob Dylan 



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Maura Ann Markley 
256 Tanglewood Drive 
North Canton, Ohio 



Stir not, whisper not 
Trouble not the giver 
Of quiet who gives 
This calm-flowing river. 



—Patrick McDonough 






Priscilla Dellevie Mendenhall 

3123 Sleepy Hollow Road 

Falls Church, Virginia 



Though nothing can bring back the hour 
Of splendor in the grass, of glory in the 

flower, 

We will grieve not, rather find 

Strength in what remains behind. 

—Wordsworth 




58 



Linda Mary Moore 

8 Lillian Terrace 

Andover, Massachusetts 



had too much to dream last night. 





Sandra Ann Murray 
Greenacres Lane 
Rye, New York 



You'll never see the world aright 
Till the sea floweth in your veins 
And you are clothed by the heavens 
And crowned by the stars. 



—Incredible String Band 



59 



Deborah Jean Naman 

13 Marwood Drive 

Andover, Massachusetts 



My love, she speaks like silence 

Without ideals of violence 

She doesn't have to say she's faithful, 

Yet she's true like ice, like fire. 



-Bob Dylan 





Adelle Roberta Nicholson 
7 Sherburne Road 
Lexington, Massachusetts 



Give me where to stand, and I will 
move the earth. 

—Archimedes 




Cynthia Ann Niziak 
121 Hidden Road 
Andover, Massachusetts 



I love a broad margin in my life. 



-Thoreau 



Sandra Ethel Perkin 

325 Likeland 

Grosse Point, Michigan 



One green day she left her wings 

And cut away her childhood strings 

But dropping smiles along the trail 

She left a trace: I will not fail. 



-Tim Buckley 





Deborah Prudden 
88 Summer Street 
Hingham, Massachusetts 



Those who bring sunshine to the lives of 
others cannot keep it from themselves. 

—James Matthew Barrie 



Nancy Leona Quick 
96 Willard Grant Road 
Sudbury, Massachusetts 



She played as many games as 
games there are 



—anonymous 





Marcia Frost Rickenbacker 

5 Glenside Terrace 

Upper Montclair, New Jersey 



A face I know is beautiful— 
With fire and gold of sky and sea, 
And the peace of a long warm river. 



—Carl Sandburg 



Melanie Jane Rosen 

387 High Street 

Fall River, Massachusetts 



The great essentials of happiness 

are something to do, something to love 

and something to hope for. 



-anonymous 




. 



63 




Suzanne C. Rowan 
209 Salem Street 
Andover, Massachusetts 



Hitch your wagon to a star. 



■Emerson 



Andra Sue Rudolph 

3 Hopkins Avenue 

Beverly, Massachusetts 



Imagination is the begin- 
ning of creation. You 
imagine what you desire; 
you will what you 
imagine; and at last you 
create what you will. 



-George Bernard Sha 



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Andrea Jenay Russ 

c/o Marcona Mining Co. 

Apartado 1229 

Lima, Peru 



little did I know 

the work I was to do 

or the love I had to show 

—Donovan 



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Antonia Maria May Salam 
145 Pickney Street 
Boston, Massacusetts 



If you smile at me I will understand 

'Cause that is something everybody everywhere 

does in the same language. 

-Crosby, Stills and Nash 



65 




Priscilla Sandford 
1275 Denmark Road 
Plainfield, New Jersey 



Walk together, talk together 
ye peoples of the Earth. 

—American Field Service 




Anne Kidder Smith 
3221 Pine Ridge Road 
Birmingham, Alabama 



sun, the earth is turning 
it's turning around 
and love is the axis. 

—Donovan 



Gretchen Cole Smith 

158 Dale Street 

North Andover, Massachusetts 



I lit my purest candle close to my win- 
dow, hoping it would catch the eye of any 
vagabond who passed it by. And I waited in 
my fleeting house. 



-Tim Buckley 





Adrienne Celeste Smelling 
2949 Greenleaf Street 
Allentown, Pennsylvania 



The hills and the sea and the earth dance. 
The world of man dances in laughter and tears. 

— Kabrir 




Toby Ava Soloman 
67 Raynor Street 
Lowell, Massachusetts 



To live is good. 

To live vividly is better. 

To live vividly together is best. 

—Max Eastman 



Christina Brewer Steele 

Upper High Street 

Peterboro, New Hampshire 

There is no duty we so much underrate 
as the duty of being happy. 

— Robert Louis Stevenson 



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68 




Susan Skillings Stein 
1405Caballero Road 
Arcadia, California 



I travelled 'round the world to find the sun. 
I couldn't stop myself from having fun. 

—Traffic 



Catherine Cake Stone 

246 Hollywood Avenue 

Rochester, New York 



Were I so tall to reach the pole 

Or grasp the ocean with my span, 

I must be measured by my soul, 

The mind's the standard of the man. 

— Isaac Watts 




Elise Claire Strauss 

Pleasant Point 

Portsmouth, New Hampshire 



It is a funny thing about life— 

If you refuse to accept anything 

but the best, you very often get it. 

—Somerset Maughan 




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Lisa Courtnay Sweitzer 
2837 Arizona Terrace 
Washington, D.C. 



Life is far too important ever to talk 
seriously about it. 

-Oscar Wilde 



70 



Josephine Jayne Swift 

6 Timothy Drive 

Andover, Massachusetts 



Sing, sweetness, to the last palpitation of 
the evening and the breeze. 

St. John Perse 





Anne Caldwell Taylor 

171 South Dawson Avenue 

Columbus, Ohio 

I had no reason to be over-optimistic, 
But somehow when you smiled 
I could brave bad weather. 

-The Who 



71 



Wendy Ann Underhill 

157 Greenfield Hill Road 

Fairfield, Connecticut 



A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that 
every human creature is constituted to be 
that profound secret and mystery to every 
other. 

—Charles Dickens 





Sandra Ann Urie 
21 Manton Road 
Swampscott, Mass. 



I sought my soul, but my soul I could not 

see. 
I sought my God, but my God eluded me. 
I sought my brother, and I found all three. 

An old verse 



72 




Kristin Bea Whyte 
3 Hidden Road 
Andover, Mass. 



Happiness runs in a circular motion. 



—Donovan 



Florence Durrie Watson 
Comegys Bight Farm 
Chestertown, Maryland 



Those who love deeply never grow old. 
They may die of old age, but they die 
young. 



Arthur Wing Pinero 




73 




Jennette Williams 

749 Park Lane 

East Meadow, New York 

.... a kind of Coney Island of the mind, 
a kind of circus of the soul. 

Ferlinghetti 



74 



Let It Be 

Sue Hosmer's Philosophy Class 




Here Comes The Sun 

Urie 

Comley 

Straus 

Rowen 

Hoy 



Delta Lady 
Anne Smith 
Lynn Waller 



Just Like a Woman 
Davison 
Sweitzer 
Anderson 



Born To Be Wild 
Niziak 
Niziak 
Niziak 



Midnight Rambler 

Tootie 

Teddy and the Abbot Security Guard 



Volunteers 

Huhn 

Williams 

Amore 

Naman 



Something in the Way She Moves 

Anderson 

Solomon 

Anderson 

Solomon 



She's a Lady 
D'Arcy 
Bowen 
Perkin 



You Can't Always Get What You Want 
Mrs. Finbury 



Highway 61 Revisited 

Breed 

Anton 



Catch If You Can 

Dantos 

Urie 

Watson 

Cheney 

Jouett 



75 




Get Off My Cloud 

Snelling 

Nicholson 



I'm Looking Through You 

Mesdames Griffith, Chittick, Ross-Dilly 



Nothing Is Easy 
Williams 




McDona/c/'s 



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Cinnamon Girl 
Luster 



Rock Around The Clock 

Luster 

Baldwin 

Stein 

Solomon 



Me and My Baby 
Sandy and Rhys 
Sandy and Rhys 
Sandy and Rhys 



Impossible Dream 
College 
Parietals 
Graduation 

In My Life 

Todd 

Hayman 

Johnson 

Bennett 

Anderson 

Garvan 

Stone 

Brightman 

Williams 

Waller 

Pike 

Rust 

Bissell 

Bailey 

McDaniel 

Quick 




76 



Evil Ways 
Day Studs 



Matchmaker, Matchmaker 

Mendenhall & Markley Enterprises, Ltd. 



Yellow Submarine 
Anton's Car 



If I Had Wings 
Gaines 
Contarino 
Freeman 



Bridge Over Troubled Waters 
Mrs. Bennett 
Miss St. Pierre 
Mrs. Hosmer 



Stoned Soul Picnic 

Hale 

Cerf 

Luster 

Williams 

Finch 



Hair 

Ingraham 

Comley 

Solomon 

Moore 



Good Morning, Little Schoolgirl 

Durham 

Maloney 

Grassi 

Williams 




Are You Experienced 
The Lucky Ones 



Sweet Blindness 
Mallen 
Chisholm 
Salam 



Up Against The Wall 

Celotto 

The Hawk 

Fox 

Swanson 

Perkins 

Shea 

Cahill 

Baldwin 



Someday Soon 

Freeman 

Cerf 

Cohen 



Foxey Lady 
Anderson 
Miss Minard 
Doyle 



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Fall 



"What is there in the birds, the birds, the birds, crying down 
on the north wind in September, acres of birds spotting the 
air going south? 

Is there something finished? And some new beginning on 
the way?" 

-Carl Sandburg 



79 



We came back. 
That first day, in September, was a marvelous mad dance of the faces 
we had kept with us all summer, along with a tremendous multitude of 
new faces. The Circle was filled with people, and the walls of the Senior 
Parlor were sparkling white and echoing our voices. We all talked that 
week, and very few of us listened. The core of our class was formed then, 
and things soon began to move around it. 




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80 





82 







84 



As October eased upon us the walls in the Parlor began to take on a 
brownish tinge, and any attempt to look out the window was hampered by 
the grease that settled there. It was indicative, somehow, of what was going 
on in our minds; a final layer of something was added on to whatever we had 
accumulated thus far. Soon the class polarized; those with iron lungs 
remained in the Parlor during the day and ascended to the closet at night. It 
was a time of growing, when all of us made cautious sorties into things that 
could be said to transcend Abbot. For some strange reason the pressure 
mounted: perhaps it was the applications in our mailboxes— a sort of 
sweepstakes entry due January 1st. Shoulders slouched against the rain, we 
walked the route towards classes which were to stimulate, and yet we came 
to understand completely the meaning of "Waiting for Godot". 

It was a nocturnal time, when typewriters picked out history papers at 
3am and later. If you timed it right, you could arrive in the Parlor just in 
time to receive the guard ascending from the kitchen. Nothing is better than 
bread and honey and milk to help forget the pains of American colonization. 






I 



.■% 





Thanksgiving came with a most unusual 
ceremony that left most of us truly 
moved. For some it was the first inward 
glance in a long time. We left gratefully, 
and came back with tales of the Stones 
and Laura Nyro— everyone had a good 
time. 



90 



H 




The stretch between Thanksgiving and 
Christmas was indescribably endless. Last 
minute applications hung over us and we were driven to escape by some 
relentless force. We spoke little and listened less. The cloud in the Parlor 
thickened. Then, finally the term ended, for some it ended with three exams 
on one day. There was a sudden burst of candlelight, and the ceilings echoed 
with "Hallelujah." The longest haul was done, and we were free. 




M^^^^M^^^^^^ 





.. 




Winter 



win ter (win' ter), n. [AS.] 1. 
The season of the year, in any 
region in which the noonday 
sun shines most obliquely; the 
coldest season of the year; 
hence, cold weather. 

-Webster's New 
Collegiate Dictionary 




Winter began i n- 
decisively, with three days 
of gradual reassimilation 
granted us before we took 
the icy plunge. 





It was a riotious time: 
hysterical conversations 
lasting long into the night, 
and we began to talk once 
again to friends we had 
left behind in the Fall. 



Then suddenly, it ended, 
and we were left with the 
bitter taste of January in 
our mouths. 





The days were brittle; 
brilliant flashes of pale 
sunlight that glittered on 
the snow. We tried to for- 
get the cold, some by run- 
ning, some by standing 
still. The month passed 
quickly, and we watched it 
go with great relief. 







With February came Spring, a kind of 
soft mocking that only emphasized 
the waiting we felt. Something was 
different, or missing, perhaps the 
snow. The awesome self-searching we 
had done the winter before cast its 
shadow on this winter, and we were 
encouraged thinking that that lay be- 
hind us. Amid many undercurrents of 
flurry came the Prom: for some it was 
an ordinary weekend of frustration, 
for others it was fun. It was a time, 
that month, when closets again be- 
came hospitable, where we could for- 
get. Within a few weeks there was a 
definite cloud over our minds. 





I 







March came, holding hands with 
November. College acceptances 
dribbled in, but most of us were still 
left waiting. We had two and a half 
weeks before we left, a time when 
those of us who had run stood still, 
and those who had stood still re- 
treated a little. We waited some more, 
and looking back, we realized for the 
first time how long winter had been. 
The weather softened, and the snow 
turned into puddles that reflected the 
sky and the swelling branches of the 
trees. 



■K 



^t^man +t iim^i-- „ — . 




Ketll Mo-use 

1st row; Laura Shultz, Anne Hyde, Dori 
Street 2nd row; Abby Johnson, Debbie 
Huntington, Nancy Mackinnon, Heidi 
Kropp, Candy Moulton, Carol Kennedy 
3rd row; Ruth Raser, Lucy Pope, Helen 
Lacouture, Rod Goldstein 4th row; Sara 
Ingram, Judy Fletcher, Bill Rubel. 
Missing; Joni Blaxter, Elizabeth Webster, 
Ann Woodd-Cahusac 



"Now that you're going to be an individual, be individual." 

We're back. New faces . . . Phyllis and Dave . . . Harriet Jones . . . Pete Smith . . . Bill Rubel . . . new 
places . . . the Butt Room . . . Hall House . . . Chapin House . . . new privileges . . . smoking all day 
(eventually) . . . Boston on Saturdays . . . pants . . . only two days of assembly . . . the "new" Coffee 
Mill. 

Laura Mae and her Barnyard friends . . . crunchy walks after lunch . . . CarWashCarWash . . . No-Dozing 
for us . . . someone answer the phone! . . . Paul is all again . . . Group W . . . early morning walks . . . 
beef fondue . . . Moratorium: armbands, candlelightjeaves ... sign me out for church... 
dodidodido . . . truckin' on the line . . . Zepplin . . . Field Day . . . Stoned Soul Picnic . . . steady stream 
of traffic flowing through Honor Board . . . some would rather fight than switch . . . Hall's Angels . . . 
serenity at Chapin House ... is everybody happy? . . . overalls cover all . . . Peanut Butter Cups . . . the 
Emotional Crisis (E.C.) . . . thusly name-taped pacifiers . . . Jorian ... we do kazoos . . . bell-bottomed 
blues . . . Mind Over Matter . . . Natural High . . . Hallelujah! 



Winter term was like an elastic 
stretched to the fullest 

then it broke. 
Yet they continued 
pulling the separate ends. 

Again they broke. 

Debbie Huntington 

Responsibility Day . . . It's a bummer . . . 
Kathy — "And she got the urge for 
going . . . "Mount Pleasant" . . . It's a 
bus! . . . really tense . . . Who's to say 
what's normal? Certainly not your 
eye . . . can I bum a Marlboro? . . . friend 
or . . . Communications Breakdown . . . 

E.C No Way . . . 

"All those noble thoughts don't belong, 
You can't hide the truth with a happy 
song . . . Just call on your rainy day 
man." . . . 

Seated: Kathy Gilman, Elly Bradshaw, Hattie Hawkins, 
Debra Kelsey, Martha Cronyn, Jennie Martin. Standing: 
Sybil Ridings, Susan Baybutt, Megan Treneer, Emily 
Schroeder, Holy Tytell Missing: Linda Hynson, Peggy 
Partridge, Tottie Wasilewski 



First Floor OrstiDei* 




Second Floor Draper 



Debra Pope, Abby Johnson, Margo 
Stever, Candy Kattar, Brownie 
Richards, Linda Hynson, Trinka 
Galusha, Sarah Gay, Karen Ho, Susie 
Foord, Susan McCouch, Stacey 
Milton, Shelby Salmon, Didi Sailing, 
Mimi Walker, Cindy Lund, Martha 
Caverly, Gayle Ridd. Missing: Linda 
Bistany, Sally Browning, Nancy 
Phillips, Chris Pollard, Sandy Rollins 




Tliirol Floor 3Dretr>er» 




make-up your sports cut in Basketball at 3:25 With- 
out Fail! . . . tunafish . . . when is a snow day . . . 
Sunday sensitivity . . . high implications . . . "Once 
there was a way to get back homeward" . . . Kattar's 
noteworthy wall . . . Puerto Rican Power ... is there 
a Mac's order? . . . Maria from Groton . . . Butt Room 
transformed into obnoxious green of sorts . . . Andy 
Ruth 1 1 1 muralizes . . . Prom: high point of term? . . . 
what's this-another date? ... big bang for future 
Bazaar . . . wombats . . . SATs . . . Rassman and 
Kranzler absent at assembly . . . give me five . . . who's 
on the list . . . check the stars . . . E.C. . . . 
tumors ... "I'm very happy to announce that the 
new vice-president . . . "it's been a long cold lonely 
winter" . . . 

Yes I know that sunrise 

It's bound to shine in my backyard 

someday 
And the wind it will rise up 
And blow my blues away." 

James Taylor 



Luis Crouch, Peggy Haskell, Sue Dampier, Tara Sartorius, Maggie 
Smith, Lucy Viele, Bea McConnie, Adison Techapaibul, Ann Wool- 
handler. Missing: Lynn Comley, Lillian Coolidge, Candy Kern, 
Kathy Kilborn 



i^H 



Day Students 




1st row; Anne Spader, Liz Spader, Mary Ann Sullivan, Cindy Johnson, Caroline Chisholm. 2nd row; Claudia Comins, Margaret Couch, Dianne 
DeLucia, Karen Pernokas, Amy Rogers, Susan Macartney, Joanne Mosca, Elizabeth Urdang, Pamela Caverly, Mary McCabe, Nancy Cohen, 
Selma Hershfield, Sara Ingram. 3rd row; Brett Cook, Martha Rogers, Vicki Harrison, Kim Grecoe, Elizabeth Kent, Jennifer McLean, Laurie 
Woodworth, Christina Landry, Joan Liversidge, Barbara Levine, Denise Mallen 




French 



1st row; Lucy Gorham, 
Debra Roth, Rosalind 
Munro. 2nd row: Nina 
Dorsey, Mama Park, 
Brenda Friend, Pricilla 
Woods, Lucy Flint, Nanpy 
Pinks, Jane Dewey, Laurie 
Camosy, Susan Nast, 
Sandy Godfrey. Missing: 
Holly Cleveland, Cindy 
Olive, Jane MacDonald, 
Joyce Johnson, Susan 
Stone, Barbara Walker. 



Our story started off quietly for most members of the Junior Class. Shortly, however, an individual 
from the renowed Abbey House felt the need to distinguish its' reputation. Thus we offer a reward to 
any girl who can tell us what really was in that paper bow. (A case for a true sleuth.) . . . The fall days 
became only a memory of the beautiful leaves blanketing the campus. The whirlwind of Christmas— and 
we were returning from vacation; all looking forward to 'tinter worm' (as our fairy godmother would 
say). Abbey House continued to head the list of the ten most wanted houses. After creditable espionage 
work by 'unknown' members of the 'staff, the notorious Abbey House ten were finally brought to 
justice. They are now members in good standing of the American Cancer Association . . . Shortly 
thereafter, Smoky Bear Pinks and mild mannered cronies extinguished an invisable fire in French 
House. (Many felt that they should have aimed in the direction of Abbey House.) . . . The atmosphere 
was tense; the rumors frequent— the big bust became a reality. No words can express how we felt as a 
whole or individually. But we left for spring vacation slightly changed . . . Spring term evaporated in a 
storm of events— Moratorium Day, Earth Day, students strikes all gave us an opportunity to show that 
apathy has not engulfed us all. Thus, towards the end we finally buckled down ... We thank several 
parties for keeping Honor Board active but ask that they concentrate on a different organization next 
year . . . Though fewer in number, we are greater in spirit .... Right on '72 



-A-lDlDey 



1st row: Susan Lilienthal, Gwen 
Fowlkes, Kathy Snowden, Alice 
Sweeney. 2nd row: Aleta Rey- 
nolds, Ellie Mish, Victoria John- 
son, Mellisa Baird, Linda Calvin, 
Lynn Graham, Sally Bloodgood, 
Susan Machie, Abby Shaine, 
Nadine Price, Libby Pennink, 
Ann Mendenhall, Penelope 
Stone, Helen Coxe, Liz Hall, 
Sandy Reynolds, Jess Straus, 
Karen Nourse. Missing: Jennifer 
Bloch, Mary Cummings, Babette 
Masse, Karen Awad, Dorothy 
Lagemann, Jeannie Russell, Kim 
Streeter 





Cixtler House 

1st row; Lynn Brazer, Ginger 
Chapman, Wendy Aird, Jane Cashin 
2nd row; Kate Tomlinson, Ha 
O'brien, Barbara Willis, Charlotte 
Mason 3rd row; Karen Lewis, Mary 
Webb, Noreen Markley 



The first conquest is to find the rooms where your classes are . . . but how? The only rooms you 
know about are the rooms in your dorm or the daystudents room . . . The learning of names of your 
classmates . . . and remembering . . . following your old girl around the school and thinking you'll never 
make it because the school is just plain too big . . . and she's gabbing about Mr. this or Mrs. that and the 
frightening tales of initiation and the P. A. mixer and you keep asking "What's initiation and what's a 
P. A.?" . . . And then the famous mixer finally arrives . . . the auctioning off at the Addison Gallery and 
wondering who's going to ditch who first . . . and then the morning after . . . "Do you like him?" . . . 
"Did he, hmmm, assume you're a junior?" . . . "Did you get a handshake instead of a kiss?" . . . Then 
the sign-ups for the remaining dances of the year . . . Upper three classes . . . ONLY . . . The wondering 
of how you're going to last through four days of sports a week . . . outside ... as the days grow colder 
and colder . . . until Thanksgiving . . . Brrr! . . . and the faces are getting a little more familiar . . . 
Rumors of a Two A.M. fire drill and getting your coats and shoes out, thinking you're all prepared— it 
doesn't come . . . until that unexpected night . . . The continual breaking of those unheard of rules . . . 
Parents weekend . . . showing your parents the "New Abbot" yet you're still wondering what the "Old 
Abbot" was like . . . Learning the names of the Will Hall boys and actually finding yourself fighting over 
them . . . Sherman House vs. Cutler House vs. Day Students . . . but the faces are getting more 
familiar . . . the anticipation of the snow and then it finally comes . . . and comes and comes . . . "Why 
don't they call a snow day?" . . . Winter term is such a hum drum drum drum . . . but the faces are 
getting all the more familiar . . . The Prom; our envy of those upperclassmen and the closest you can 
ever get is serving ... oh well! There are always the tips! . . . The countdown until sprjng vacation ... 3 
weeks ... 2 weeks . . . Spring Term! . . . pull yourselves out of the snow drifts . . . Spring fever sets in 
and P. A. seems all the more interesting . . . When is our next dance . . . And Graduation ... are we 
invited? . . . but as the year draws to a close you realize all you've been through together . . . some 
things you laugh about . . . others you just think about . . . and the faces are actually familiar . . . 

Sherman House 



1st row: Connie Petty, Buzzy 
Rollins, Susan Urie, Mardi Hudson 
2nd row: Dorinda Davis, Susan 
Costa, Molly Prescott, Kathy 
D'Abre, Kim Whittemore, Jane 
Pugh 3rd row: Betsy Coward, Liz 
Robert, Anne Weisman, Leila Percy 



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103 







We left with no thought of coming 
back, but soon we found ourselves to- 
gether again. It was our last Spring, 
and yet it seemed merely an extension 
of our last winter and our last fall. 



y/////n 



104 




We waited, with the distinct 
impression that the end of the 
waiting would be as nebulous 
as the thing we were waiting 
for. 






tf/JIIII 



105 






Winter melted into Spring with 
scarcely a jolt, and the time slipped 
quickly towards that hour when we 
would leave the things and the people 
we had come to know and love. 




106 




Take what we can before the land says it's time to go 
Each to his own way— I don't mind 
Best of luck with what you find 

But for your own sake remember times we used to know. 

Jethro Tull 





108 



Fettrons 



Andover House of Carpets, Inc. 
Mr. and Mrs. Broaddus 
Mr. and Mrs. W.B. Cleveland 
Dr. and Mrs. R.H. Clifton 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank I. Cohen 
Mr. and Mrs. A.F. Contarino 
Mr. John Cox 
Mr. and Mrs. G.M. D'Arcy 
A Friend 

Mr. and Mrs. Victor Gares 
Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Hale 
Mr. and Mrs. Alan J. Huttenberg 
Mr. and Mrs. George Ingram, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. M.S. Johnston, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John K. Jouett 
Mr. Charles L. Kennedy 



Mr. and Mrs. Clarence E. Knapp 

Mr. Joseph K. Lilly, III 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger M. Lindgrove 
John S. Mason 
Alfred Naman 
Oscar R. Padjen 
L.R. Partridge 
Frank S. Perkin 
S.B. Pinks 
Flower Shop 
Robert A. Street 

Mr. and Mrs. Rainey S. Taylor, Jr. 

Mr. Alfred Tytell 

Mr. and Mrs. R.C. Urie 

Woolworths 



Mr 
Mr 
Mr 
Mr 
Dr, 
Mr 



and Mrs. 

and Mrs. 

and Mrs. 

and Mrs. 

and Mrs. 

and Mrs. 
Olde Village 
Mr. and Mrs. 



109 




Emptiness is the 
Senior Parlor 
without the 
Seniors. 

Class of '71 



110 





■ 



■ 




Thanks to Franny for the Macs 



"The future is a mysteriously wonderful 
thing that pulls you away from your 
past. But don't forget the little things 
that were left behind. " 

Junior Class 



"the cherry bloom has gone— a temple 
in among the trees, is what it has become. 

From '73 to '70 



111 



ijiiiS§f%Pi 



■lftjr~ 




Lawrence 
Ea^peTHbiine 



Lawrence Eagle Tribune 

New England's largest daily 
OFFSET newspaper, serving Greater 
Lawrence, communities, in Essex 
County, Middlesex County and 
Southeastern New Hampshire. 
Winner of Editor & Publisher 
award for outstanding offset 
color reproduction in its 
circulation class. 



112 





\* 



'■■% 



X 



V 



Webber Lumber Company 





Sheraton Rolling Green 
Motor Inn 





W. R. Hill, Inc. 
And over 



Best Wishes . . . Russems 
Lawrence 



Taylor Shop 
Andover 



The Shoe Tree 
Andover 




Andover Co-op 







| 



f 



Williams' 
Andover 



I 






i 



Best Wishes to the 
Class of 1970 

Dr. and Mrs. Sidney W. Rosen 



• 




4 



Construction Company, Inc. 
2604 Washington Rd. Kenocha, Wisconsin 

53140 

general contractors 



Home and Abroad 
Andover 




Compliments of 
Jouett Insurance Agency, Inc. 
P.O. Box 270 
St. Thomas, Virgin Islands 

00801 



Fieldstone's 
Andover 



117 



Special Thanks 



Anne Crowley 

Liza Gaines 

Rob Christie 

Grant Gibbons — for a good attempt 

Bill Brenizer 

Len Stewart 

The U-Room 

The Running Horse Farm 



118 



The Andover Shop 



Andover 



Cambridge 



Compliments of 
Cole's Nursing Home Inc. 
10 Summer Street 
Andover, Mass. 

Fred and Terry MacDonald 



Lantern Brunch Inc. 
Olde Andover Village 
Andover, Mass. 01810 



Compliments of 
Coffee Mill Restaurant 
Andover, Mass. 

. . . Fred and Terry MacDonald 




) 





■■■■ 



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Compliments of 

Philip Keller Foundation 

North Andover, Mass. 



Billings, Inc. 
Andover 



Intimate Apparel 

for Mother and Daughter 

The Dame Shop, Inc. 

48 Main St. Andover, Mass. 

Tel. 475-1658 



Grecoe Jeweler 

Official School Jewelry 

Jewelers/Opticians/Certified Repair Service 

46 Main Street 

Andover, Mass. 



Andover Bookstore, Inc. 
Andover 



120 



K. P. Thompson 
Andover 



The Yankee Lady 
Andover 



School Portraits — Specialty 

LOOK Photo Service 

PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES 

93 Main St. 

Andover, Mass. 

475-1452 475-2232 



Sam's Delicatessen 
Andover 



Smart and Flagg 
The Insurance Office 

for over 100 years 

Olde Andover Village 

91 main St. 

Andover 
Tel. 475-6161 





Compliments of 
The Andover Gift House 



Phinney's 

Radio — Television — Stereo 

Sales and Service 

Complete Line Records 

24 Park St. Andover, Mass. 

475-1175 



Lelia's 
Andover, Inc. 



House of Clean 
Andover 



Macartney's 

Casual Clothes 

for Young Ladies 



122 



~\ 




Best of luck to the 
class of '70 

The Day Students 



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Interior Designers 

and 

Home Furnishers 

The Studio Shoppe, Inc. 

America's Finest Furniture 

85 Manchester St. 

Lawrence, Mass. 

Francis T. Niziak 

Pres. Tres. 






-V ■ 



Pikk 




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